New Books Finished in 2016

Catchup post – since I skipped summing up the year between my 2015 and 2017 book posts I thought I’d jump back and fill in the blank. I’m a list checker and the gap was irritating me ;). In 2016 I read 41 new-to-me books – very low for me. We started the year with kids who were 3, 3, 1, and a baby and the first half of the year was intense. We house-hunted and purchased a home in another state, prepped our home for market, went through the process of showings and closings, prepared to move cross-country, had some really nasty illnesses, temporarily lived in a hotel, moved cross country, had some more awful illnesses, weathered a major spike in special needs issues, and gradually settled into our new home. It was good year, but certainly not a relaxing one for lots of deep reading. I’ve marked favorites in each category in bold.


  • Cider with Rosie by Laurie Lee


  • Station Eleven by Emily St. John Mandel
  • Morningside Heights by Cheryl Mendelson
  • The World We Found by Thrity Umrigar
  • The Revolving Door of Life (44 Scotland Street series) by Alexander McCall Smith
  • The Joy Luck Club by Amy Tan
  • Father Elijah by Michael D O’Brien


  • Outliers by Malcolm Gladwell
  • Garlic and Sapphires: The Secret Life of a Food Critic by Ruth Reichl
  • On Writing: A Memoir of the Craft by Stephen King
  • Different: The Story of an Outside-the-Box Kid and the Mom Who Loved Him by Sally and Nathan Clarkson
  • When Breath Becomes Air by Paul Kalanithi
  • Hillbilly Elegy: A Memoir of a Family and Culture in Crisis by J.D. Vance
  • Parenting the Hurt Child: Helping Adoptive Families Heal and Grow by Gregory Keck and Regina M Kupecky
  • Divine Secrets of the Ya-Ya Sisterhood by Rebecca Wells
  • My Grandfather’s Son: A Memoir by Clarence Thomas
  • Happier at Home by Gretchen Rubin


  • Seeking Allah, Finding Jesus: A Devout Muslim’s Journey to Christ by Nabeel Qureshi
  • Surprised by Oxford by Carolyn Weber
  • Give Me This Mountain by Dr. Helen Roseveare


  • A Great Reckoning (Inspector Gamache Series) by Louise Penny
  • Firestorm by Nevada Barr
  • Liverty Falling by Nevada Barr
  • Track of the Cat by Nevada Barr
  • A Share in Death by Deborah Crombie
  • All Shall Be Well by Deborah Crombie
  • Leave the Grave Green by Deborah Crombie
  • Mourn Not Your Dead by Deborah Crombie
  • Miss Pym Disposes by Josephine Tey


  • All-of-a-Kind Family by Sydney Taylor
  • Anna Hibiscus by Atinuke*
  • Hooray for Anna Hibiscus by Atinuke*
  • Good Luck Anna Hibicus by Atinuke*
  • Have Fun Anna Hibiscus! by Atinuke*
  • Stuart Little by E.B. White*
  • On the Edge of the Dark Sea of Darkness by Andrew Peterson
  • North or Be Eaten by Andrew Peterson
  • The Monster in the Hollows by Andrew Peterson
  • The Warden and the Wolf King by Andrew Peterson
  • The Mouse and the Motorcycle by Beverly Cleary*
  • Dinosaurs Before Dark (Magic Tree House #1) by Mary Pope Osborne*

(There were other read-alouds, but they weren’t new to me so they’re not on this new books list)



New Books Read in 2017

I’ve tracked my reading since I was 15. In my teens and early twenties I wrote all new titles (re-reads and picture books don’t count) in a small blue notebook. These days I use Pinterest and write an end-of-year summary. I missed summarizing last year’s reading here. This year’s total is 78 books, up significantly since our days of four kids aged two and under! While the exact number of books read isn’t significant it’s a good indicator of a balanced life for me with time for personal development and relaxation. This year I read fewer classics than usual, mainly because I’ve discovered so many great current reads via the What Should I Read Next podcast and the Read Aloud Revival podcast. This year’s reading tended toward lighter and fun vs. longer or more heavily theological or intellectual books. I had a few specific areas of deliberate exploration. I wanted to read more books by African diaspora authors, some Australian mystery novels, finish all the novels written by the Bronte’s that I’d yet to read, and read more (read: any) poetry than I have in recent years. Mysteries made up a solid chunk of the reading, as did memoirs and autobiographies. I also read a lot of chapter books out loud to the kids, but only counted them if they were new to me. I’ve put my favorites at the top of each category in bold, and a few notations as applicable when a book crossed categories or met one of those sub-goals. If I strongly disliked a book I’ve noted that as well.


  • Their Eyes Were Watching God by Zora Neale Hurston (African American)
  • Shirley by Charlotte Bronte
  • Villette by Charlotte Bronte
  • Dr. Wortle’s School by Anthony Trollope
  • The Mill on the Floss by George Eliot (DISLIKED. Oh my word…all THAT for THAT ENDING? I don’t feel bad about all-caps loathing because the author is long-dead.)


  • What Work Is by Philip Levine
  • The Last Shift by Philip Levine


  • The Connected Child by Purvis and Cross (truly outstanding if you’re an adoptive, foster, or special needs parent)
  • Mastering the Art of Soviet Cooking: A Memoir in Food and Longing by Anya von Bremzen
  • Startle and Illuminate: Carol Shields on Writing edited by Anne and Nicholas Giardini
  • Travels with Charley: In Search of America by John Steinbeck
  • Four Seasons in Rome by Anthony Doerr
  • Bill Peet: An Autobiography by Bill Peet (an unusual book, but a fun time machine)
  • Down a Sunny Dirt Road: An Autobiography by Stan & Jan Berenstain (like Peet’s book, a visual and imaginative treat)
  • Lab Girl by Hope Jahren
  • Between the World and Me by Ta-Nehisi Coates (African American)
  • A Circle of Quiet by Madeleine L’Engle
  • Birds, Beasts, and Relatives by Gerald Durrell
  • At Home in the World by Tsh Oxenreider
  • A Homemade Life by Molly Wizenberg
  • The Duchess of Bloomsbury Street by Helene Hanff
  • Pilgrim at Tinker Creek by Annie Dillard
  • Earthly Pleasures: Tales from a Biologists Garden by Roger B. Swain
  • The Professor and the Madman: A Tale of Murder, Insanity, and the Making of the Oxford English Dictionary by Simon Winchester
  • Say Goodbye to Survival Mode by Crystal Paine
  • How to Manage Your Home Without Losing Your Mind by Dana K. White
  • So You’ve Been Publicly Shamed by Jon Ronson
  • Neither Here nor There by Bill Bryson (Disliked. I thought this was very weak for a Bryson book. Interaction with locals is often the highlight of a travel book but this was just an extremely crass litany of what he ate, where he stayed, and how the weather behaved)


  • Interpreter of Maladies by Jhumpa Lahiri
  • Gilead by Marilynne Robinson
  • News of the World by Paulette Jiles
  • All the Light We Cannot See by Anthony Doerr
  • The Stone Diaries by Carol Shields
  • The Storied Life of A.J. Fikry by Gabrielle Zevin
  • Ready Player One by Ernest Cline
  • The Course of Love by Alain de Botton
  • The One-in-a-Million Boy by Monica Wood
  • Dark Matter by Blake Crouch
  • Homegoing by Yaa Gyase (African)
  • The Light Between Oceans by M.L. Stedman
  • The Madwoman Upstairs by Catherine Lowell
  • The Bertie Project by Alexander McCall Smith
  • The Underground Railroad by Colson Whitehead (African American)
  • The Awakening of Miss Prim by Natalia Sanmartin Fenollera
  • My Name is Lucy Barton by Elizabeth Strout


  • A Murder of Magpies by Judith Flanders 
  • The Beekeeper’s Apprentice by Laurie R. King
  • The Likeness by Tana French
  • The Dry by Jane Harper (Australian)
  • A Bed of Scorpions by Judith Flanders
  • A Cast of Vultures by Judith Flanders
  • Dreaming of the Bones by Deborah Crombie
  • Glass Houses by Louise Penny (Inspector Gamache series)
  • The Broken Shore by Peter Temple (Australian)
  • A Beautiful Place to Die by Malla Nunn (African/African-Australian)
  • Kissed a Sad Goodbye by Deborah Crombie
  • A Monstrous Regiment of Women by Laurie R. King


  • The Life-Giving Home by Sally and Sarah Clarkson
  • He Gave Us a Valley by Dr. Helen Roseveare
  • Catholics and Protestants by Peter Kreeft
  • One Thousand Gifts by Ann Voskamp (Disliked. If you like Voskamp’s blog writing – sort of stream-of-consciousness, ethereal, gushy – you’ll like this. However, I really have to grit my teeth for that kind of writing so it was a slog for me. I did really like individual parts and her theme of thankfulness and awareness of God’s gifts)


  • 100 Cupboards by N.D. Wilson
  • Dandelion Fire by N.D. Wilson
  • The Chestnut King by N.D. Wilson
  • The Incorrigible Children of Ashton Place: The Mysterious Howling by Maryrose Wood (listen to the audiobook, the narrator is fabulous and we laughed so hard we cried. Highly highly recommended. The next two books in the series are fun but not as strong)
  • Half Magic by Edward Eager
  • One Crazy Summer by Rita Williams-Garcia (African American)
  • Incorrigible Children of Ashton Place: The Hidden Gallery by Maryrose Wood
  • The Incorrigible Children of Ashton Place: The Unseen Guest by Maryrose Wood
  • Miracles on Maple Hill by Virginia Sorensen
  • The Crossover by Kwame Alexander (African American)


  • Owls in the Family by Farley Mowat
  • Beezus and Ramona by Beverly Cleary
  • When We Were Very Young by A.A. Milne
  • Charlotte’s Web by E.B. White
  • Mr. Popper’s Penguins by Richard and Florence Atwater
  • Ramona the Pest by Beverly Cleary
  • A Bear Called Paddington by Michael Bond

The following books don’t count toward the total. They were read-alouds to the kids (mainly the twins) but either I’d read them in the past or in the case of a couple, I thought they were too short to count toward this list even if they were chapter books. It’s still fun to record what we read together though:

  • The Lion, the Witch, and the Wardrobe by C.S. Lewis (this is the first book I remember my Mom reading aloud to me. I loved it then and it’s special to have my kids, especially our son, fall head over heels in love with it now.
  • Sarah, Plain and Tall by Patricia MacLachlan
  • Mary Poppins by P.L. Travers
  • Charlie and the Chocolate Factory by Roald Dahl (The Man read this one and they LOVED it)
  • Mercy Watson to the Rescue by Kate DiCamillo (this one’s so simple even the toddlers loved it)
  • Pirates Past Noon (Magic Tree House #4) by Mary Pope Osborne (The kids like this series…I find it almost unbearable to read aloud)
  • Flat Stanley by Jeff Brown
  • Little House on the Prairie by Laura Ingalls Wilder (I don’t have a date so it’s possible we finished this in late 2016, not 2017)


Daybook for the First Week of Spring

Outside my window…

Sunshine is pouring down after a long stretch of cold gray days. [I wrote that two days ago. Now it’s gray and dreary, but at least it’s in the 50s]. We’ve had an odd winter with bitter cold and loads of snow in December followed by a snow-less January and February. Temperatures vacillated between frigid cold and balmy spring-like days. We even had a couple thunderstorms and a tornado watch in the mix. Flower buds popped out along the bare branches on our crap apples and daffodil shoots sprouted all over the yard. Now that it’s March we’ve had another four sticking snows and the kids finally got to use the sleds they received for Christmas. All the plants about to bloom have paused and hunkered back down looking a bit sheepish. If they had feelings I think they’d mirror the embarrassment one feels after standing up for a song in church, looking it up in the hymnal, then glancing around after finding the page to realize everyone else has remained seated. A purely hypothetical scenario not based on personal experience at all, of course. We moved into this house in June so I’m looking forward to seeing the yard in Spring for the first time.

I am thankful…

At the natural history museum. Only Josie seems to grasp the peril of their situation

…that the stomach flu continued on its way after afflicting only Jack. Poor Jack, but lucky us. [Update from two days later: apparently I jinxed myself. Reward: spending half last night up with a vomiting baby].

…for community. We’re glad to be closer to family  but have badly missed our old neighborhood, friends, church, and military community in North Carolina. We’re finally starting to build a few connections after many months of church hunting and it’s a nice feeling.

…for bigger kids. This is the last day of The Man’s latest stretch of ICU call. ICU is still exhaustingl and intense on the home front, but so much easier than it used to be. The Man came home late in the evening yesterday, glanced around the tidied-right-before-bed-with-the-kids house, and commented “You know, the house could never have looked this good in the middle of an ICU week a year ago.” It’s true. 4, 4, 2, and 1 is a very different state than 3, 3, 1, and an infant. When he’s gone for extended stretches it’s still (very) hard work but I don’t constantly feel like I’m scrambling to keep body and soul together. There’s just enough breathing space for little extras like a museum trip, park stop, or store run with all four in tow. I even made it to church solo with all four little kids this morning – a first! They can do things now like eat a picnic lunch in the car with (reasonable) tidiness, skip the occasional nap or snack, or delay a meal half an hour without imploding. Altogether, just a little more flexibility in our days.

I am thinking

about Spring plans outside and inside. Our home has basic landscaping but nothing more. We’d like to plant flower beds, a vegetable garden, some fruit trees, and a few berry bushes but will have to see what time allows. We’re also debating school plans for next year. Continue as we have with private school a couple mornings a week and low-key homeschooling on other days? Public special needs preschool? Full time homeschooling with more room for therapy? Another option?

Learning all the time…

with baking experiments. I love to cook and bake but can easily fall into a rut thanks to the basic necessity of feeding all these people all these meals on all the days. I really haven’t done much with yeast breads in the past. So, in place of the usual familiar dessert baking I’ve been experimenting this Lent with various yeast-based doughs: pizza dough, Smitten Kitchen’s Cheddar rolls (delicious, but I think better with tomato soup than for breakfast), and a couple batches of whole wheat/whole grain bread. Do you have a favorite recipe (or cookbook) for whole wheat bread, the perfect pizza dough, or something else? I’m all ears. We’ve had reasonable success but risen doughs are definitely a learned skill.

Celebrating the liturgical year…

with a low-key Lent. I can’t say we’ve done anything specifically Lenten as a family though we continue as usual with daily Bible reading, prayers, and hymns with the kids. As adults it’s been a quiet but beneficial Lent so far. Not dramatic, but steady. While it’s not specifically Lenten, I’ve also been enjoying richer and more consistent scripture study since Christmas. We’re pretty consistent about reading the Bible as a couple but I’ve struggled with sticking to my own devotions. I’m a fast reader and often find myself skimming through the Bible when I sit down to read it. On the other hand, when I use a formal study the intellectual perfectionist side of me rears its head and I find myself writing exhaustive answers to each question and lost for hours on a section that’s designed to take ten minutes. That’s not bad except that I then get impatient and frustrated and abandon the whole thing. At the end of December I jumped (late) on an Advent-focused scripture writing challenge. I started a new one in January and found I really benefited from the forced slow pace and intense focus of hand-writing a passage instead of just reading it. At the beginning of February I decided to start copying an entire book by hand. I settled on Romans because it’s middle-of-the-road in length, theologically rich, and one I haven’t studied in a while. Because I know myself and my tendency to do things just to check them off the list I didn’t even break it into sections to tackle and check off. Every morning I just read the next passage (usually 3-6 verses), hand copy it, re-read it, then rapidly skim the book back up to that point to place it in context and make sure I’m tracking. I’m happy to say, after years of on-again-of-again personal study that I’ve missed only a couple of days since January first. I’m half way through Romans and am pausing to outline the first eight chapters and review. 6 weeks sounds like a long time for eight chapters but I’m flying compared to my childhood pastor who preached through Romans for two straight years. There really is such a thing as too much of a good thing.

From the kitchen…

as mentioned above, yeast breads. Also, a fair number of meatless meals like potato pancakes, leek and potato soup, salads, black beans, and pasta. I also made crepes for the first time using the Joy of Cooking recipe. I substituted 1/3 whole wheat flour for all purpose. My Mom used to make crepes and I love them so I don’t know why it took me so long to get on the bandwagon. They make a nice Lenten special family breakfast. I skipped the sugar in the batter, spooned warm applesauce down the middle, rolled them up, and sprinkled cinnamon on top. A hit with everyone. Were it not Lent that’d be cinnamon sugar, the way my Mom used to make them for us on cold winter mornings. After Easter there’ll be blintzes and crepes with Nutella and strawberries in our treats lineup.

I am creating…

a scarf. Very. Very. Very. Sloooowly. At this rate it will be ready just in time for the stifling heat of August. Knitting is not a “just like riding a bike” skill for me. I’ve learned and then forgotten how to knit many times: as a small child, an older child, in college, and again while The Man was deployed. At some point after the twins became mobile one crawled to the knitting basket and tangled my work-in-progress. I never finished it. Two more babies followed and all skills were again forgotten. I’m just now getting to the point where there’s a smidgen of breathing room for handcrafts. Courtesy of YouTube I’m now back to knitting Continental Style. I’m making this pattern without the contrasting center stripe or letters.

I am working on…

bits of spring cleaning, as time allows.

I am going

to lots and lots of therapy appointments. Physical therapy for me, feeding therapy for Jenny (the end is in sight after almost three years!), Speech, OT, and Behavioral Therapy for Annie. In addition there are specialist visits for various children and routine pediatrician and dental checkups needed. I don’t really like being a family that has someplace to be every day of the week but right now it’s necessary. Whenever possible I treat appointments as special 0ne-on-one time with a child. We chat in the car, play music of the kid’s choice, and read books or play one-on-one together in the waiting room. Often the long drives are also a good time for me to catch up on my podcasts queue or listen to an audiobook if the child isn’t in a chatty mood.

I am hoping

to prepare well in advance for a weekend trip to New York. Practically, though, who am I kidding ;).

I am praying…

for our three older kids and their first families. Adoption is complicated and messy. A blessing, yes, but also a tremendous loss.

I am pondering

Jack’s face of concentration. Ha!

special needs parenting. I’m reading as much as I can get my hands on. There’s a wealth of (often contradictory) information out there. It’s hard to take that flood of information in, filter it, and decide what’s best for a child who doesn’t yet have much say. Unfortunately many Christian parenting books take a one-size-fits-all approach to parenting that may work with typically developing children but is poorly suited to kids with neurological differences.  It’s humbling as a parent who thought I knew everything before having kids (and frequently judged others’ parenting) to realize that much of our kids’ behavior and growth cannot, and sometimes should not, be controlled by us. It’s a constant fight to focus on what a child really needs and not the way others around us are judging the child or our parenting.

I am reading

Travels with Charley by John Steinbeck as an audiobook read by Gary Sinise. It’s wonderful, and Sinise has the perfect voice for it. Even if you’re not a Steinbeck fan I highly recommend this account of his casual journey through 40 states. He combines dry wit and poetic description with detached observation and a warm interest in the people he meets. I love a good armchair travel book but frequently cringe at travel writer’s scornful summary of the people they encounter. I can’t imagine how the people Bill Bryson or Paul Theroux describe must feel at the authors’ sardonic assessments of their lives. Steinbeck manages to describe foibles without mockery and approaches others on his travels with warm interest. I’m also reading Madeleine L’Engle’s first memoir A Circle of Quiet which is enjoyable and thought provoking. She’s incredibly well-read so each page brings up some other book I should also read. Dangerous fodder.

I am listening to

Podcasts, whenever I can. When I was growing up my parents frequently had the radio on. Classical music, talk radio, or the news in the car, often Old Time Radio or Car Talk on Saturday mornings. I almost never turn the radio on but I think Podcasts are my equivalent. It’s nice to have a grownup talking to me about something interesting as I do the dishes or fold laundry. We’re also listening to classical music quite a bit as the kids usually request “singing” in the car and one can tolerate only so much of Elizabeth Mitchell or the OkeeDokee Brothers. Right now it’s Haydn’s masses in the car and Beethoven in the CD player at home.

I am hearing

The washing machine gently swishing, laundry tumbling ’round the drying, and an anemic burbling from our increasingly useless coffee maker. The baby spent half the night vomiting through multiple rooms so I’m in wash-and-sterilize-everything mode.

I am struggling

with my hair. Which sounds a bit silly and vain but I’ve never been a hair or makeup person. All my life I’ve just washed every couple days, combed or brushed, and tossed it back in a bun, braid, or ponytail without blow drying, styling, or products. The very hard water in our new home is wreaking havoc on my hair though and it constantly looks unkempt. Dry strands, frizz, and unevenness abound. The hard water doesn’t really bother us in any other way so I’m wondering if there are better product choices vs. investing vast sums in a water softener.

Clicking around

Well, not much really. I’m doing my best to cut back on social media in particular and screen time in general. Which, bonus, allows time for things like writing and reading!

Around the house…

SuperDad comforts four fussing children at once.

we’re making plans for painting a few rooms. We haven’t made any changes to the house and have only hung one picture since we moved in Hopefully we can get a few small projects done before warmer temperatures pull our living outside. We’re adding in some more consistent chores for the big kids now that they’re four. We’ve always had them help, but are adding in a few more regular jobs at regular times for them like vacuuming the dining room after meals and a set whole house cleanup every evening. They’re still at the age where it’s more work to supervise them than to do it ourselves, but it’ll be worth it in the long run.

One of my favorite things…

The quiet hour or two before the kids get up. I’ve been consistently getting up at 5:00 or 5:30 since New Years with only a couple of later days from illness or missed alarms. I consider the earliest hours my personal time. For this introvert it’s a key window to read, eat a quiet breakfast, do my Bible study, exercise, or knit. Sometimes I squeeze in a chore or two, but I don’t feel obligated to use that time for household purposes. I find when I start the day with something mentally fulfilling I’m a much better spouse and parent throughout the day.

A few plans for this week…

About typical for our “selfies for six” attempts. Seven if your count Annie’s beloved bear.

Therapies and specialist appointments. Dinner with the pastor’s family tonight. Sending off picture and email updates to the kids’ birth families.

A little peek at my day…

A sick baby overnight means a freshly-bathed baby with fabulous hair in the morning.










Currently Reading – Late April Edition


The Man: Still reading the Wingfeather Saga. He’s on Book 3 and loving it. This being an ICU week, it’s more “reading” than reading. He’s only actually read his patients’ charts and sympathetic “I’m sorry you had to stay all night with a sick patient and catch two hours sleep on the office floor”-type texts from his wife

Me: Just finished the last of the Morningside Heights trilogy, Anything for Jane, and moved on to another book in my TBR stack. The kids absconded with it this morning, so until I dig it out from under a couch or in a cupboard your guess at the title is as good as mine…

The Kids: As always, we read big stacks from the library and our own stash every week. I only record the standouts worth revisiting here. Our current chapter book is Mrs. Piggle-Wiggle by Betty McDonald. I’m reading half a chapter or a chapter out loud after the twins’ bedtime picture book and hymn each night.

This week’s big favorites from the library (repeating the picture here because I’m too tired for hyperlinks tonight and I trust your google skills) are Lola M. Schaefer’s One Special Day and One Busy Day, Jonathan Bean’s Big Snow, and Elisha Cooper’s Train. 


Schaefer’s books were such a fun discovery this week.I love her whimsical and engaging art. Her stories are simple but creative. One Special Day tells the story of a little boy named Spencer who is strong, wild, funny, and muddy,yet oh-so-gently welcomes his brand new baby sister with love. Sweet but not saccharine, funny, and the art is delightful. Each page is full of tiny little details that kids love to spot. I think this is an ideal book to give a new big brother or sister. Unlike many “a new baby is coming” books it doesn’t give a list of negatives about baby siblings. It’s completely positive.

One Busy Day follows Spencer and his little sister a few years down the line as they play together through a long and imaginative day. Again, great art, and the grownups and the kids in our house both enjoy it. Both books are ideal for the 2-5 age group.



We’ve already read and re-read Jonathan Bean’s wonderful At Night many times. His book Building Our House made waves in children’s publishing circles in recent years (though I’ve yet to read it). He was homeschooled and his new book This is My Home, This is My School is the first traditionally-published picture book about homeschooling. I’d never heard of his Big Snow until I saw it at the library last week but I’ve fallen head-over-heels for it. The kids adore it too. It follows a little boy through a winter day as he alternates between”helping” his Mom in their home (with disastrous results) and checking outside for snow. This book perfectly captures the impatient anticipation little kids feel for snow, the pleasant warmth of a cozy winter home, the quiet wonder of a blizzard, and the contentment of a happy family. It’s set around Christmas but never specifically mentions the holiday so it’s a pretty good all-around winter (or anytime) book. Each outdoor page has fun little details to spot around the town. I liked that the Mom is dark-skinned with curly hair. It is so hard to find good Christmas books with black main characters for our kids!



Last but not least on this week’s library favorites list is Elisha Cooper’s Train. We’ve borrowed it in the past and it’s always a pleasure to revisit. This book takes you across the United States by a series of trains. The book opens with a commuter train leaving an East Coast city, hands off to a passenger train en route to Chicago, continues on through the great plains by freight train, hands off to an overnight train through the mountains, and completes the last leg to the west coast by high speed train. Cooper’s beautiful watercolors and evocative text are pleasing for kids and adults alike. This book strikes just the right balance between keeping the story moving and introducing informative details about trains and railroads to young readers. Bonus, this book depicts a wide variety of races and families. We also borrowed another of his books, Beach. That story dragged a bit and the art felt less varied (though beautiful) but it, too, did a great job depicting racial diversity.


What are you reading these days?