New Books Read in 2017

I’ve tracked my reading since I was 15. In my teens and early twenties I wrote all new titles (re-reads and picture books don’t count) in a small blue notebook. These days I use Pinterest and write an end-of-year summary. I missed summarizing last year’s reading here. This year’s total is 78 books, up significantly since our days of four kids aged two and under! While the exact number of books read isn’t significant it’s a good indicator of a balanced life for me with time for personal development and relaxation. This year I read fewer classics than usual, mainly because I’ve discovered so many great current reads via the What Should I Read Next podcast and the Read Aloud Revival podcast. This year’s reading tended toward lighter and fun vs. longer or more heavily theological or intellectual books. I had a few specific areas of deliberate exploration. I wanted to read more books by African diaspora authors, some Australian mystery novels, finish all the novels written by the Bronte’s that I’d yet to read, and read more (read: any) poetry than I have in recent years. Mysteries made up a solid chunk of the reading, as did memoirs and autobiographies. I also read a lot of chapter books out loud to the kids, but only counted them if they were new to me. I’ve put my favorites at the top of each category in bold, and a few notations as applicable when a book crossed categories or met one of those sub-goals. If I strongly disliked a book I’ve noted that as well.

CLASSICS

  • Their Eyes Were Watching God by Zora Neale Hurston (African American)
  • Shirley by Charlotte Bronte
  • Villette by Charlotte Bronte
  • Dr. Wortle’s School by Anthony Trollope
  • The Mill on the Floss by George Eliot (DISLIKED. Oh my word…all THAT for THAT ENDING? I don’t feel bad about all-caps loathing because the author is long-dead.)

POETRY

  • What Work Is by Philip Levine
  • The Last Shift by Philip Levine

NONFICTION 

  • The Connected Child by Purvis and Cross (truly outstanding if you’re an adoptive, foster, or special needs parent)
  • Mastering the Art of Soviet Cooking: A Memoir in Food and Longing by Anya von Bremzen
  • Startle and Illuminate: Carol Shields on Writing edited by Anne and Nicholas Giardini
  • Travels with Charley: In Search of America by John Steinbeck
  • Four Seasons in Rome by Anthony Doerr
  • Bill Peet: An Autobiography by Bill Peet (an unusual book, but a fun time machine)
  • Down a Sunny Dirt Road: An Autobiography by Stan & Jan Berenstain (like Peet’s book, a visual and imaginative treat)
  • Lab Girl by Hope Jahren
  • Between the World and Me by Ta-Nehisi Coates (African American)
  • A Circle of Quiet by Madeleine L’Engle
  • Birds, Beasts, and Relatives by Gerald Durrell
  • At Home in the World by Tsh Oxenreider
  • A Homemade Life by Molly Wizenberg
  • The Duchess of Bloomsbury Street by Helene Hanff
  • Pilgrim at Tinker Creek by Annie Dillard
  • Earthly Pleasures: Tales from a Biologists Garden by Roger B. Swain
  • The Professor and the Madman: A Tale of Murder, Insanity, and the Making of the Oxford English Dictionary by Simon Winchester
  • Say Goodbye to Survival Mode by Crystal Paine
  • How to Manage Your Home Without Losing Your Mind by Dana K. White
  • So You’ve Been Publicly Shamed by Jon Ronson
  • Neither Here nor There by Bill Bryson (Disliked. I thought this was very weak for a Bryson book. Interaction with locals is often the highlight of a travel book but this was just an extremely crass litany of what he ate, where he stayed, and how the weather behaved)

FICTION

  • Interpreter of Maladies by Jhumpa Lahiri
  • Gilead by Marilynne Robinson
  • News of the World by Paulette Jiles
  • All the Light We Cannot See by Anthony Doerr
  • The Stone Diaries by Carol Shields
  • The Storied Life of A.J. Fikry by Gabrielle Zevin
  • Ready Player One by Ernest Cline
  • The Course of Love by Alain de Botton
  • The One-in-a-Million Boy by Monica Wood
  • Dark Matter by Blake Crouch
  • Homegoing by Yaa Gyase (African)
  • The Light Between Oceans by M.L. Stedman
  • The Madwoman Upstairs by Catherine Lowell
  • The Bertie Project by Alexander McCall Smith
  • The Underground Railroad by Colson Whitehead (African American)
  • The Awakening of Miss Prim by Natalia Sanmartin Fenollera
  • My Name is Lucy Barton by Elizabeth Strout

MYSTERIES

  • A Murder of Magpies by Judith Flanders 
  • The Beekeeper’s Apprentice by Laurie R. King
  • The Likeness by Tana French
  • The Dry by Jane Harper (Australian)
  • A Bed of Scorpions by Judith Flanders
  • A Cast of Vultures by Judith Flanders
  • Dreaming of the Bones by Deborah Crombie
  • Glass Houses by Louise Penny (Inspector Gamache series)
  • The Broken Shore by Peter Temple (Australian)
  • A Beautiful Place to Die by Malla Nunn (African/African-Australian)
  • Kissed a Sad Goodbye by Deborah Crombie
  • A Monstrous Regiment of Women by Laurie R. King

CHRISTIAN

  • The Life-Giving Home by Sally and Sarah Clarkson
  • He Gave Us a Valley by Dr. Helen Roseveare
  • Catholics and Protestants by Peter Kreeft
  • One Thousand Gifts by Ann Voskamp (Disliked. If you like Voskamp’s blog writing – sort of stream-of-consciousness, ethereal, gushy – you’ll like this. However, I really have to grit my teeth for that kind of writing so it was a slog for me. I did really like individual parts and her theme of thankfulness and awareness of God’s gifts)

YOUTH NOVELS

  • 100 Cupboards by N.D. Wilson
  • Dandelion Fire by N.D. Wilson
  • The Chestnut King by N.D. Wilson
  • The Incorrigible Children of Ashton Place: The Mysterious Howling by Maryrose Wood (listen to the audiobook, the narrator is fabulous and we laughed so hard we cried. Highly highly recommended. The next two books in the series are fun but not as strong)
  • Half Magic by Edward Eager
  • One Crazy Summer by Rita Williams-Garcia (African American)
  • Incorrigible Children of Ashton Place: The Hidden Gallery by Maryrose Wood
  • The Incorrigible Children of Ashton Place: The Unseen Guest by Maryrose Wood
  • Miracles on Maple Hill by Virginia Sorensen
  • The Crossover by Kwame Alexander (African American)

CHAPTER BOOKS READ TO THE KIDS

  • Owls in the Family by Farley Mowat
  • Beezus and Ramona by Beverly Cleary
  • When We Were Very Young by A.A. Milne
  • Charlotte’s Web by E.B. White
  • Mr. Popper’s Penguins by Richard and Florence Atwater
  • Ramona the Pest by Beverly Cleary
  • A Bear Called Paddington by Michael Bond

The following books don’t count toward the total. They were read-alouds to the kids (mainly the twins) but either I’d read them in the past or in the case of a couple, I thought they were too short to count toward this list even if they were chapter books. It’s still fun to record what we read together though:

  • The Lion, the Witch, and the Wardrobe by C.S. Lewis (this is the first book I remember my Mom reading aloud to me. I loved it then and it’s special to have my kids, especially our son, fall head over heels in love with it now.
  • Sarah, Plain and Tall by Patricia MacLachlan
  • Mary Poppins by P.L. Travers
  • Charlie and the Chocolate Factory by Roald Dahl (The Man read this one and they LOVED it)
  • Mercy Watson to the Rescue by Kate DiCamillo (this one’s so simple even the toddlers loved it)
  • Pirates Past Noon (Magic Tree House #4) by Mary Pope Osborne (The kids like this series…I find it almost unbearable to read aloud)
  • Flat Stanley by Jeff Brown
  • Little House on the Prairie by Laura Ingalls Wilder (I don’t have a date so it’s possible we finished this in late 2016, not 2017)

 

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3 thoughts on “New Books Read in 2017

  1. hi there!! miss you guys!

    oh man the berensteins have a autobiography?!? i should get that from the library, huh?

    and thanks be to heaven for the RAR website, because i kind of ran out of books to recommend to my almost 10 year old and i just don’t feel comfortable letting him find books how i did as a child – aka hang out at the library for a couple hours and pick u every book that looked good. 😦 our library selection is terrible in more ways than one, its depressing. but i checked out half the fantasy list and he’s loving ti! didn’t like 100 cupboards tho, he found it too scary/intense. but just blew through a few Grace Lin books, Peter Nimble, and has the penderwicks and Green Ember awaiting him!

    • I miss your updates! RAR is so handy. I place a library hold on their full list of favorite picture books by month. They still have a long way to go on diverse picks, but their trying and I take their ideas, then add in supplements. Yeah, I can see how 100 cupboards could be too intense for a lot of younger kids. Is he ready for A Wrinkle in Time? I want to read Peter Nimble myself. Love the Penderwicks! If he liked those he might like the Swallows and Amazon series and E. Nesbitt’s books. Bonus, once he’s started on those there are a lot more in both series!

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