Recent Reads

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When I was a kid my family rarely watched TV. However, my parents often had the radio on in the background. Car Talk or Old Time Radio accompanied Saturday morning chores. NPR, Rush Limbaugh (*shudder*), and Chicago’s classical station rode with us in the car. We must have been hushed hundreds of times for talking too loudly during “traffic and weather on the eights” as we navigated rush hour jams. Remember when you depended on the news helicopters and broadcasters instead of a smart phone traffic map? The Man and I don’t listen to the radio much these days – just a little classical and the excellent sacred music program on Sunday mornings – but 2015 was the year I discovered podcasts. They’re good company for chores and add a little adult mental jolt to days with the littles. Two favorites are Modern Mrs. Darcy’s “What Should I Read Next” podcast for grown-up reading suggestions and book discussions, and Sarah McKenzie’s Read Aloud Revival podcast for kids’ and youth reading ideas. I’ve found so many good books through both of them.

Right now The Man is enjoying The Wingfeather Saga books by Andrew Petersen. They’ve been mentioned on both the podcasts for fans of series like Narnia and Harry Potter. Supposedly the first book is a bit less good than the rest of the series, but worth pushing through. I’m next in line for the books when my husband finishes.

I just finished two Modern Mrs. Darcy recommendations: Garlic and Sapphires by Ruth Reichl and Morningside Heights by Cheryl Mendelson. Reichl’s book is a funny, poignant, and always mouth-watering account of her years as the food critic for The New York Times. Restaurants in NYC maintained such a keen watch for critics (then lavished them with special treatment) that she created a series of disguises to slip in under their notice. I enjoyed the book, and look forward to dipping into her other works.

Cheryl Mendelson’s Morningside Heights was a treat. I’m so glad it’s the first in a trilogy – more to enjoy! Mendelson is a Harvard Law graduate who later transitioned to academia. Out of that intellectual background came her surprise bestseller Home Comforts: The Art and Science of Keeping House. It’s a smart but eminently readable and practical home manual. I love the introduction, when she confidently upholds the idea that you can be a well-educated intelligent hardworking woman who still finds joy and satisfaction in a well-run and pleasant home. It’s my Mom’s standard wedding shower gift, with good reason. Who knew you could write a page-turner about laundry? When Mendelson turned her clear and warm voice to fiction, the result was an Austen-like novel set in modern New York. It’s funny, creative, thoughtful, philosophical, touching, and engaging. The views are often different from my own, but it’s delightful. A lovely discovery!

Our local librarians generally pick great books to display on top of the children’s bookcases. I dashed in for five minutes over the weekend to fill my arms with books they’d set out (didn’t even attempt digging through the shelves!) before hustling home for a house showing. The twins adored “So Much” by Trish Cooke, illustrated by the always lovely Helen Oxenbury. A baby and his mother greet a parade of visiting relatives. Each showers him with love in their own way – reading books, kisses, dancing, wrestling, hugs. In the end you discover that everyone has gathered to surprise Daddy for his birthday. I don’t know that I’d pay for this one, but I like the snappy African-American vernacular text, sweet depiction of an extended family, and the way it’s prompted Jack to walk around gushing “I love you SOOOOOOO much” ;). Good for the three-and-under crowd.

One I will consider buying is the gorgeous Nature’s Day by Kay Maguire. This meaty but deliciously tempting book is ideal for introducing younger kids to nature observation and seasons. Beautiful illustrations and tid-bitty text are arranged thoughtfully. The book covers eight settings (“the fields” “the pond” “the garden” through each of the the four seasons. So, for example, you first see what’s happening with birds, the woods, the garden, fields, the pond, town, etc. in Spring. In the summer, fall, and winter sections you revisit each location. What’s happening in the orchard in fall? What might you spot in the winter
woods? It’s a British book, but generally translates well to the American landscape. Though it’s written for kids, I learned something on every page. It makes an excellent resource for browsing at home, or scanning before heading outdoors to spark observation. A gem.

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